The Summit on Teaching in the 21st Century

The Summit on Teaching in the 21st Century reflects UCI’s distinctive commitment to transforming how higher education engages, supports and teaches all students. This is one of the most exciting times in higher education as the national commitment to widening access gathers pace alongside innovative new research on effective and inclusive teaching, much of it fueled by an unprecedented access to data.

The Summit’s three distinguished keynote speakers will highlight the critical issues facing higher education, such as the challenges associated with widening access, and the obstacles to effectively leveraging research to achieve institutional change. The Summit will also put a spotlight on the leadership UCI faculty are playing both in educational research and the implementation of evidence-based approaches to effective and inclusive teaching. This Summit will thus further confirm UCI’s status as a beacon for pedagogical innovation and student success in the higher education sector.

This is a public-oriented Summit in which the immediate audience is the UCI and Orange County community; however, the presentations will be recorded and shared widely.

When:

March 6th, 2020
10am – 5pm

Where:

The Cove
UCI Beall Applied Innovation
5270 California Avenue
Irvine, CA





Meet our Keynote Speakers

Dr. Karen Marrongelle

Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation
Learn more…

Andrew Delbanco

Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia
Learn more…

Sylvia Hurtado

Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Information, UCLA
Learn more…

Other Guest Speakers

Willie Banks – Vice Chancellor for UCI Student Affairs
Richard Arum – Dean of the UCI School of Education, and Professor of Sociology and Education
Michael Dennin – Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning, Dean of the UCI Division of Undergraduate
Education, and Professor of Physics & Astronomy
Duncan Pritchard – A Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, UCI School of Humanities
Di Xu – Associate Professor, UCI School of Education
Nia Dowell – Assistant Professor, UCI School of Education
Fernando Rodriguez – Assistant Professor of Teaching, UCI School of Education
Mark Warschauer – Professor, UCI School of Education
Rachel Baker – Assistant Professor, UCI School of Education
Angela Jenks – Associate Teaching Professor, UCI Social Sciences
Laura Mitchell – Associate Professor, UCI School of Humanities
Laura Tucker – Assistant Professor of Teaching, UCI Physics and Astronomy
Brian Sato – Professor of Teaching, UCI Molecular Bio & Biochemistry
Adrienne Williams – Assistant Professor of Teaching, Developmental and Cell Biology
Ted Wright – Associate Professor, UCI Social Sciences
Brandon Golob – Assistant Professor of Teaching, UCI Law and Society
Natascha Buswell – Assistant Professor of Teaching, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UCI Samueli School of Engineering
David Schaefer – Associate Professor, UCI School of Sociology
Penelope Collins – Associate Professor, Faculty Director of Undergraduate Programs, UCI School of Education
Joel Veenstra – Associate Professor of Teaching, UCI School of Arts-Drama

The Venue

The event will be at UCI Beall Applied Innovation at their brand new purpose-built event space that features 180 degrees of seamless display technology. This inviting, ultramodern space is the ideal location for our Summit on Teaching in the 21st Century!


Tentative Schedule

9:30 a.m.   Registration Open
10:00 a.m. Welcome
Michael Dennin
Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning, Dean of the UCI Division of Undergraduate Education
Remarks by
Chancellor Howard Gillman
10:15 a.m. Karen Marrongelle
The Future of Teaching and Teaching for the Future: Advancing Discoveries in Education
to Drive the Scientific Enterprise
11:15 a.m. Break
11:30 a.m. Session A: Active Learning at UCI
Brian Sato and Andrea Aebersold
Panelists: Ted Wright, Laura Mitchell, Brandon Golob, Angela Jenks
Session B: Advances in Online and Virtual Learning
Duncan Prichard, Mark Warschauer, and Di Xu
12:15 p.m. Lunch
1:15 p.m.  Student Panel
1:45 p.m.  Andrew Delbanco
 Andrew Delbanco – Why Confusing our Students can be a Good Thing
2:45 p.m.  Parallel Sessions: UCI at the Forefront of Education Research
 Session A:
 Rachel Baker
 Laura Tucker
 Fernando Rodriguez
 Session B:
 Adrienne Williams – SEISMIC Changes in Undergraduate STEM Education:
 Collaborative Education Research Across Courses and Universities
 Nia Dowell
 Natascha Buswell
 Session C:
 Joel Veenstra
 Penelope Collins – Infographics to Support Writing Instruction
 David Schaefer
3:15 p.m.  Break
3:30 p.m.  Sylvia Hurtado
 Deepening Our Commitment: The Science of Effective Mentorship
4:30 p.m.  UCI’s Teaching Ecosystem
 Richard Arum, Michael Dennin, Diane O’Dowd, Willie Banks
 Panel Moderator – Jennifer Friend Smith, Class of 95
5:00 p.m.  Closing Remarks

Meet the Organizers

Michael Dennin

Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning, Dean of the UCI Division of Undergraduate Education, and Professor of Physics & Astronomy

Richard Arum

Dean of the UCI School of Education, and Professor of Sociology and Education

Duncan Pritchard

A Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at UCI’s School of Humanities

Sponsors


Need Help?

For questions about sponsorship, please contact Matt Princetta.
For logistical questions or for speaker support, please contact Amanda Sivgals.


Keynote Speakers Bios & Talk Descriptions


The Future of Teaching and Teaching for the Future: Advancing Discoveries in Education to Drive the Scientific Enterprise
Dr. Karen Marrongelle is the Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) for Education and Human Resources (EHR). She leads the EHR directorate in supporting research that enhances learning and teaching to achieve excellence in U.S. science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.

Prior to joining NSF, Marrongelle was dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Portland State University and Professor of Mathematics and Statistics, where she oversaw 24 departments and programs across the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences.

In addition to her work as dean, Marrongelle, has served as a faculty member in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Portland State University since 2001. Prior to her appointment as dean, she held positions as the Vice Chancellor for Academic Strategies and Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Standards and Collaboration with the Oregon University System.

From 2007-2009, Marrongelle served on a rotation as a program officer at NSF and led numerous grants, collaborating with researchers nationally and internationally to improve undergraduate mathematics education and K-12 mathematics professional development.

Marrongelle has a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and philosophy from Albright College, a master’s degree in mathematics from Lehigh University and a doctorate in mathematics education from the University of New Hampshire.



Why Confusing our Students can be a Good Thing
Andrew Delbanco is the Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia, winner of Columbia’s Great Teacher Award, and author of College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be (2012). His most recent book, The War Before the War: Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle for America’s Soul from the Revolution to the Civil War, won the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and the Mark Lynton History Prize. In February 2012, President Barack Obama presented Professor Delbanco with the National Humanities Medal for his writings on higher education and the place classic authors hold in history and contemporary life.

Professor Delbanco will discuss the history of America’s colleges and universities, in particular the ideal of liberal education in a democracy, and some of the challenges confronting educators and students today–as well as a number of responses that hold promise for meeting those challenges.



Deepening Our Commitment: The Science of Effective Mentorship
Sylvia Hurtado is Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Information, and served as Director of the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles for more than a decade. A member of the National Academy of Education, she has over 100 publications, having written extensively on campus climate, the experiences of underrepresented identity group in college, and diversity in higher education. Dr. Hurtado grew up in San Antonio, Texas and received an A.B. degree from Princeton University in Sociology; an M.Ed. in Administration and Social Policy from the Harvard Graduate School of Education; and a Ph.D from UCLA in Education.